Simi Hoque’s Urban Modeling

Dr. Simi Hoque is passionate about improving the ways in which buildings use the earth’s resources.  She teaches environmental systems and sustainable design principles in the Department of Environmental Conservation at UMass Amherst. Her research, partially funded by the Center’s Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station, is focused around the application and development of energy-efficient buildings. Dr. Hoque specializes in energy modeling, resource efficiency, and systems design. She is co-author of a recent online publication (October 2013) intended to provide a quantitative approach to assessing sustainability indicators in a city. Research Cities today generate almost two-thirds of the world’s primary energy demand. By 2030, this is projected to increase to three-quarters, matching the urban sector’s expected share of global energy-related CO2 emissions. The current urban outlook demands a comprehensive understanding of urban sustainability policies and programs to address climate change and energy security. Dr. Hoque’s research is aimed at developing an analytical framework to integrate the performance indicators for buildings, transportation systems, and green spaces...
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Dave Damery interviewed by WWLP on environmental impact of growing fuel

BCT Program Director Dave Damery was recently interviewed by Springfield's WWLP TV station on the environmental impact of growing fuel. As we turn away from fossil fuels and towards biofuels more land will be needed to grow the biomass. How will this impact land use? Especially here in Massachusetts. Dr. David Damery, director of building materials and wood technology and associate professor at UMass-Amherst explains. Environmental impact of growing fuel: wwlp.com...
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BMATWT Students’ Greasy Endeavour makes it into the Globe and on TV

Amherst, March 29, 2007 Two Building Materials & Wood Technology students do their part to green America. In a time where filling stations charge anything between $2.00 and $3.50 per gallon of gasoline, brothers David and Richard Posluszny pay 28 cents per gallon for fuel. This is accomplished by clarifying and using recycled vegetable oil from restaurants for their personal transportation (an old Mercedes Benz). As of now, their story has been featured in the Boston Globe and on the Hallmark Television channel. See their method in the video below or simply visit their website to learn more. Links: Website: http://www.thegreasybrothers.com/ BMATWT students' greasy endeavor makes it into the Globe. (2/27/2007) (PDF) ...
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